Black bean brownies

I, like any other logical human being, approach the idea of vegetables or legumes in desserts with great skepticism. Having seen so many (false) testimonies to their amazing taste, and having attempted a chocolate beetroot muffin myself (did I accidentally add dirt?) I know what you are thinking. 

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Down to business. Does my generally skeptical viewpoint help convince you that I wouldn't share this recipe unless I could vouch for it? I hope so. Because honestly, you can't even tell you are eating beans. I swear it. And they don't even taste like dirt either. AAAAND As a side note, Nigella makes an excellent zucchini cake that may help dispel your aversion to foreign cake ingredients. 

This recipe originates from my old blog started way back when. Isn't it pleasantly surprising when something past you did is still good in the present? 

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INGREDIENTS

1 can of black beans, drained
1/2 cup yoghurt (I used Yalna Sweet and Creamy which is an all round absolute winner)
1/4 cup cocoa or cacao
1/2 cup dark chocolate chips
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 egg
1/2 teaspoon pysllium husk
1 teaspoon olive oil
2 tablespoons espresso (fresh if you have the luxury of a coffee machine)
small pinch of salt 

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METHOD

1. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius, and melt the chocolate chips while you are at it. (Can you tell I forgot to add in a step and am too lazy to alter my complicated numerical system?!)
2. Put the black beans and the melted chocolate into the food processor and buzz for about a minute, or until all nicely incorporated.
3. Add errthang else, and mix until well combined.
4. Grease a loaf tin or a small square tin, and pour in the brownie mix.
5. Pop in the oven and bake for around 45 minutes to an hour. I get the feeling this number is dependent on the prowess of your oven, so make sure you watch the brownies. The top while start to look crackly and cooked, and you will think 'hey! Brownie time.' And then bam! Underneath will still be mush. So use a skewer to check if you aren't sure.

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